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Google wants to give Africans R1.3m just about every for news-business suggestions, amid Australian war

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  • Applications for the next round of the Google News Initiative Innovation Problem across the Africa region just opened.
  • Projects that qualify can obtain grants of up to R2.2 million. Or, in fantastic situations, perhaps even far more.
  • Any person from freelancers to firms can use.
  • “Jobs can be experimental”, but ideally Google is looking for tangible strategies to build new profits streams for media organisations.
  • Australia and massive tech providers are at present at war about media funding, and the battle looks most likely to spill over into Europe.
  • For much more stories go to www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

Apps have just opened for a new spherical of a Google-funded scheme to help media organisations in the African region boost their revenues – as tech giants combat it out with Australia about funding news.

The Google News Initiative Innovation Challenge offers up to $150,000 (R2.2 million) in funding for selected suggestions,

Toronto-based video platform Rumble sues Google, accusing tech giant of steering traffic to YouTube



text: Rumble sued Google LLC this week, accusing the search giant of unfairly favouring its YouTube video platform.


© Provided by Financial Post
Rumble sued Google LLC this week, accusing the search giant of unfairly favouring its YouTube video platform.

A Toronto-based video platform has joined governments and regulators in accusing one of the world’s largest technology companies of using its market power to improperly squeeze out competitors.

Rumble, which launched in 2013 with an emphasis on pet and baby videos but which has more recently courted conservatives angered by labelling and censoring of posts on other social media apps, sued Google LLC this week, accusing the search giant of unfairly favouring its YouTube video platform.

In the lawsuit, Rumble alleges Google engaged in practices including “rigging its search algorithms purposefully and unlawfully to always give preference to Google’s YouTube video-sharing platform over Rumble (and other platforms) in Google search results,” according to a document filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.

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